By Aaron Moran (Ireland)
HAYWIRE QUAD@50%.indd

 

Spy Movies Gone Old School

Haywire begins in the snow and through the tone and feel of the movie it stays in the snow, you never once feel a connection or warmth for any of the characters even your heroine Mallory Kane never once lets you in to understand how she feels no matter how many bodies she disposes of.

I believe the tone of the film is this way due to director Steven Soderbergh’s back catalogue. All of his films have a certain slickness and feeling of detachment, this is simply his style and you either like it or you don’t. The plot of Haywire feels at times simple and others convoluted. The plot though is not why people will pay to see this movie, and the main reason is the fights, they are quick, efficient, brutal and most importantly real. Mallory Kane is played by Gina Carano, herself a former cage fighter who Soderbergh saw watching TV one night and decided to build a film around.

Fights these days usually consist of super quick editing and leave you wondering if you’re watching a stunt double or an actor. Haywire pulls no punches (no pun intended) when it comes to the fight scenes, nearly all are shot in one long take and importantly no music is played during these scenes.

The film boasts an incredible cast with the likes of Michael Douglas, Ewan McGregor, Bill Paxton, Michael Fassbender and Channing Tatum rounding off the cast. Even a cast as veteran as that can’t save Carano from flat line deliveries, she is simply not an engaging screen presence no matter how hard Soderbergh tries to hide it. The film is an entertaining one if not very memorable, worth watching but does nothing new for the spy genre.

 

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