By Jay Quinn (Tonawanda, NY)


As I do with every review I give a back story of why I like these kinds of films and what impact they had on me as a kid and now. As I have said in the past, I grew up on old school horror films when I was a kid. The first movie I ever watched was Universal’s 1931 Frankenstein film, it left an impact on me because I was obsessed because of how good it was. I never saw a film like Frankenstein before and it led me down the “rabbit hole” of the genre of film making known as horror. After I had my fill of universal monsters, I needed more to satisfy my craving for monster movies and my next big company of movies that I was going buffet on was a company known as Hammer Films.

Now Hammer Films like Universal Studios wanted to do their own monster movies but with their films they pushed the edge with blood and they were in color whereas Universal’s movies were black in white. Hammer Films has a special place in my heart because they have a certain flavor of horror, so to speak, that really creeps me out and makes me smile. I don’t know why but British horror just impresses me because they don’t need to rely on gore to scare you. They use music, sound and environment to creep you out and set the tone. In 2008 Hammer Films had a revival, they started doing horror movies again which made me happy because they were really missed in my eyes and in the horror genre. In 2012 after the Harry Potter franchise ended, Daniel Radcliffe was announced to be a part of Hammer Film’s new horror movie The Woman in Black. The film was a remake of the 1989 film of the same name based on the book by Susan Hill.

The film was a mix of a little Hammer Films film making and a lot of traditional American horror and it was a success. Daniel Radcliffe was downright amazing in it and just shows how good he is as an actor. When they announced the sequel I was happier than a pig in slop because I really enjoyed the first one. Then the reviews came out and most of them were negative and I got nervous. I love Hammer Films and I loved the first Woman in Black movie but was scared to check out this sequel because of said reviews from people. Tonight I sat down with Netflix, some snacks and consumed this sequel, and before I get into my review of it let me give you an idea of what this sequel is about, for those who saw the first Woman in Black film. This movie takes place 40 years after the original film ends and we are mid-way through World War II. While bombs are dropping in London, a school teacher, Eve Parkins, and her headmistress, Jean Hogg, move her school’s children to the country side of Crythin Gifford.

They move all the children and themselves into the infamous haunted house known as Eel Marsh House. Where a legend of a woman in black named Jennet, haunts and has children kill themselves and claims their souls due to her own child being taken years ago. She has cursed this house and everyone that comes in it. Now after seeing this film, hearing the critics and audience’s negative reviews I got to say I really, really enjoyed this film for what it was. Unlike the first film with Daniel Radcliffe where they tried to do a balance of Hammer Film style and traditional American horror film making, this is a true throwback to Hammer Film style film making. This isn’t your traditional horror movie at all, and that’s where it shines for me. It is downright creepy with its music, tone, the way it tells its story and how it was shot. If you’re looking for a true British ghost story that will creep you to the bone, then definitely check this film out.

Don’t listen to reviews and go in with an open mind. Is it a perfect film? No, but it doesn’t claim to be. It’s meant to scare you before you go to bed and make your nerves come unglued. The jump scared worked for me and this movie creeped me out like the original did. So in closing Ii really enjoyed this film and mad at myself for not seeing it sooner.

I give this movie 3 out of 5 skulls.


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