Moneyball Movie Quotes: A Home Run!

(Total Quotes: 69)


Directed by: Bennett Miller
Written by:
Steven Zaillian (screenplay)
Aaron Sorkin (screenplay)
Stan Chervin (story)
Michael Lewis (book “Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game”)
Brad Pitt – Billy Beane
Jonah Hill – Peter Brand
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Art Howe
Robin Wright – Sharon
Chris Pratt – Scott Hatteberg
Stephen Bishop – David Justice
Brent Jennings – Ron Washington
Ken Medlock – Grady Fuson
Tammy Blanchard – Elizabeth Hatteberg
Jack McGee – John Poloni
Vyto Ruginis – Pittaro
Nick Searcy – Matt Keough
Glenn Morshower – Ron Hopkins
Casey Bond – Chad Bradford
Nick Porrazzo – Jeremy Giambi
Kerris Dorsey – Casey Beane
Arliss Howard – John Henry
Reed Thompson – Young Billy
James Shanklin – Billy’s Dad
Diane Behrens – Billy’s Mom


Moneyball movie quotes unfold smoothly to give us one of those rare movies that even those who couldn’t care less about baseball or sports will find engaging. The movie based on a book by Michael Lewis and it gives the audience and interesting take on how to win at the game of baseball and it’s also based on the true story of real life Oakland A’s general manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) and how he turned around the team with the help of an Ivy league graduate computer whiz Peter Brand (Jonah Hill).

The chemistry between Pitt and Hill helps drive the movie and gives it life with Pitt giving one of his best performances.

Verdict: It’s a sharp, shrewd, intelligent and satisfying movie and for all the concentration on numbers, it never loses sight of the fact that this is a game of people.

Moneyball Quotes Page  1   2   THE NOVEL


[Billy’s is in his boss’s office talking about the game Billy’s team lost]
Stephen Schott: How are the guys doing?
Billy Beane: It was a killer. It was a killer. It was a tough one to swallow. It was…moneyball-3
Stephen Schott: Ah, they played great. They did…
Billy Beane: Oh, they played their hearts out. They…they did, they played fantastic and it just didn’t fall our way.
Stephen Schott: They’ll do better next year.
Billy Beane: We were close though, weren’t we? We were so close, right there.
Stephen Schott: You almost had it. You gotta feel good about that.
Billy Beane: Oh, I feel great about. I feel great about it.


Billy Beane: Um…we’re not gonna do better next year.
Stephen Schott: Why not?
Billy Beane: Well you know we’re being gutted. We’re losing Giambi, Damon, Isringhausen. Done deal. We’re in trouble.
Stephen Schott: You’ll find new guys. You found Jason, you found Damon.
Billy Beane: We need more money Steve.
Stephen Schott: Bill.
Billy Beane: I need more money!
Stephen Schott: We don’t have any more money.
Billy Beane: I can’t compete against a hundred and twenty million payrolls with thirty eight million dollars.
Stephen Schott: We’re not gonna compete with these teams that have big budgets. We’re gonna work with the constraints that we have and you’re gonna get out and do the best job that you can recruiting new players. We’re not gonna pay seventeen million dollars a year to players.


Billy Beane: I’m not asking you for ten, twenty, thirty million dollars. I’m just asking for a little bit of help. Just get me a little bit closer and I will get you that championship team. I mean, this is why I’m here. This is why you hired me. And I gotta ask you what are we doin’ here?
Stephen Schott: Billy, you know I…
Billy Beane: If it’s not to win a championship?
Stephen Schott: I wanna win just as…
[Billy holds his hand up high]
Billy Beane: That’s my bar. My bar is here. My bar is to take this team to the championship.


Stephen Schott: Bill we’re a small market team and you’re a small market GM. I’m asking you to be okay not spending money that I don’t have. And I’m asking to take a deep breath, shake off the loss, get back in a room with your guys and figure out how to find replacements for the guys we lost with the money that we do have.
Billy Beane: I’m not leaving here. I’m not…I’m not…I can’t leave here with that.
Stephen Schott: What else can I help you with?
[Billy looks despondent]
Billy Beane: Yep.


[talking on the phone]
Scott: Billy? Scott. Just got off the phone with Dan.
Billy Beane: No, you didn’t!
Scott: I’m surprised he even called me.
Billy Beane: Scott, I got Johnny for seven point five and he doesn’t play anywhere else, so that’s the deal you made.
Scott: Well he just upped it to seven five.
[Billy doesn’t answer]
Scott: You there?
Billy Beane: We had a deal, Scott.
Scott: We have a deal, if it’s eight million.
Billy Beane: Oh, man! You played me.
Scott: I’m just doing my job…
Billy Beane: No, you’re playing me and you’re still playing me. Congratulations, asshole! You win.
[he hangs up the phone]


[at the scouts meeting discussing the players]
Grady Fuson: Artie, who do you like?
Scout Artie: I like Perez. He’s got a classy swing, it’s a real clean stroke.
Scout Barry: He can’t hit the curve ball.
Scout Artie: Yeah, there’s some work to be done, I’ll admit that.
Scout Barry: Yeah, there is.
Scout Artie: But he’s noticeable.
Matt Keough: And an ugly girlfriend.
Scout Barry: What does that mean?
Matt Keough: Ugly girlfriend means no confidence.
Scout Barry: Okay.
John Poloni: Oh, now, you guys are full of it, Artie’s right. This guy’s got an attitude and an attitude is good. I mean it’s the kind of guy who walks into a room his dick has already been there for two minutes.
Scout Pote: He passes the eye candy test. He’s got the looks, he’s great at playing the part. He just needs to get some playing time.
Matt Keough: I’m just saying his girlfriend is a six at best.


Grady Fuson: We’re trying to solve a problem here.
Billy Beane: Not like this you’re not. You’re not even looking at the problem.
Grady Fuson: We’re very aware of the problem.
Billy Beane: Okay, good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: Okay, Billy. We all understand what the problem is. We have to replace…
Billy Beane: Good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: The problem is we have to replace three key players.
Billy Beane: No. What’s the problem?
John Poloni: Same as it’s ever been. We’ve gotta replace these guys with what we have existing.
Billy Beane: No! What’s the problem, Barry?
Scout Barry: We need three eight home runs, a hundred twenty R.B.I’s and forty seven…
Billy Beane: Aaahhh! The problem we’re trying to solve is that there are rich teams and there are poor teams, then there’s fifty feet of crap, and then there’s us. It’s an unfair game. And now we’re being gutted, organ donors for the rich. Boston has taken our kidneys, Yankees takin’ our heart and you guys are sittin’ around talkin’ the same old good body nonsense, like we’re selling deeds. Like we’re looking for Fabio. We got to think differently.


Billy Beane: We are the last dog at the ball. You’ve seen what happens to the runt of the litter? He dies!
Grady Fuson: Billy, that’s a very touching story and everything, but I think we’re all very much aware of what we’re facing here. You have a lot of experience and wisdom in this room, now you need to have a little bit of faith and let us do the job of replacing Giambi.
Billy Beane: Is there another first base player like Giambi?
John Poloni: No, not really.
Billy Beane: And if there was, could we afford him?
Grady Fuson: No.
Billy Beane: Then what the fuck are you talkin’ about, man? If we try to play like the Yankees in here, we will lose to the Yankees out there
Grady Fuson: Boy, that sounds like fortune cookie wisdom to me, Billy.
Billy Beane: No, that’s just logic.
Scout Bob: Who’s Fabio?


[at the offices of the Cleveland Indians, Billy meets their GM to see if he can procure some players]
Mark Shapiro: How’s it going?
Billy Beane: It’s goin’ alright. How are you been? You’re fillin’ out that chair nicely.
Mark Shapiro: Well I got three weeks in it right now.
Billy Beane: Good. Good, man.
Mark Shapiro: How are you doin’?
Billy Beane: Fantastic!
Mark Shapiro: Awesome!
Billy Beane: I couldn’t be better.
Mark Shapiro: Well, that’s good to hear, Billy. I’m not gonna waste your time, man. You just tell me what you’re lookin’ for.
Billy Beane: Fifty million dollars in additional payroll.
Mark Shapiro: You should try Giambi.
Billy Beane: Ouch!
Mark Shapiro: I’m sorry. It’s too soon, right?


[as Billy is about to leave the Cleveland office he comes back to Peter for making Shapiro change his mind selling his players]
Peter Brand: Hello.
Billy Beane: Who are you?
Peter Brand: I’m Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: What do you do?
Peter Brand: I’m special assistant to Mark Shapiro.
Billy Beane: So what do you do?
Peter Brand: Mostly player analysis right now.
Billy Beane: Been on the job long? First job in baseball?
Peter Brand: It’s my first job anywhere.
Billy Beane: Wow! Congrats.
Peter Brand: Thank you.
Billy Beane: First job. Who’s nephew are you? Why does Mark listen to you?
Peter Brand: I don’t think uh…I don’t think he does very often.
Billy Beane: He just did.
Peter Brand: Well, in that circumstance I think he was more listening to Bruce than myself.


Billy Beane: Who are you?
Peter Brand: I’m Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: I don’t give a rat’s ass what you’re name is. What happened in there? What happened in that room?
Peter Brand: I’m not quite sure why you’re asking me, Mr. Beane.
Billy Beane: What did you tell, Bruce?
Peter Brand: I just told Bruce that I liked Garcia.
Billy Beane: You like Garcia. Why? Why?
[Peter doesn’t answer so Billy gets up and leaves the office with Peter following him]


Peter Brand: There is an epidemic failure within the game to understand what is really happening and this leads people who run major league baseball teams to misjudge their players and mismanage their teams. I apologize.
Billy Beane: Go on.
Peter Brand: Okay, people who run ball clubs, they think in terms of buying players. Your goal shouldn’t be to buy players. Your goal should be to buy wins and in order to buy wins, you need to buy your run. You’re trying to replace Johnny Damon. The Boston Red Sox see Johnny Damon and they see a star who’s worth seven and a half million dollars a year. When I see Johnny Damon, what I see is…is an imperfect understanding of where runs come from. The guy’s got a great glove, he’s a decent league off hitter, he can steal bases. But is he worth the seven and a half million dollars a year the Boston Red Sox are paying him? No! No! Baseball thinking is medieval, they are asking all the wrong questions and if I say it to anybody I’m…I’m ostracized. I’m a rebel, so that’s why I’m…I’m cagey about this with you, that’s why I respect you Mr. Beane and if you want full disclosure, I think it’s a good thing you got Damon off of your payroll. I think it opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities.


Billy Beane: Where you from, Pete?
Peter Brand: Maryland.
Billy Beane: Where did you go to school?
Peter Brand: Yale, I went to Yale.
Billy Beane: What did you study?
Peter Brand: Economics. I studied Economics.
Billy Beane: Yale, Economics, baseball. You’re funny, Pete.
[Billy gets into the elevator and leaves]


[we see a young Billy being recruited for pro baseball]
Billy’s Dad: Tell me why Billy? What is it that makes him special?
Scout #1: It’s very rare that you come upon a young man like Billy. Who can run, who can field, who can throw, who can hit and who can hit with power. Those five tools, you don’t see that very often.
Scout #2: Most of the youngsters in the league and have an interest in have one or two tools and we’re hoping to develop and extra one. Your son has five, I mean we’re looking at a guy that’s a potential superstar for us in New York and the time is right now to get him started.
Scout #1: We’re prepared to make a sizeable financial commitment. The Mets are gonna stand behind Billy because we expect him to be our big league center field. This check here represents the offer that the New York Mets would be making to Billy.
Billy’s Mom: You do know that he’s been accepted to Stanford on a full scholarship?
Scout #1: I do.
Billy’s Mom: So he can do both?
Scout #1: Unfortunately he can’t do Stanford and professional baseball. He would have to pick one or the other. If he wants to be the center fielder for the New York Mets, he wants to be the baseball player, he really needs to accept this as life’s first occupation, a first career. We’re all told at some point in time that we can no longer play the children’s game, we just don’t… don’t know when that’s gonna be. Some of us are told at eighteen, some of us are told at forty, but we’re all told. But this is a once in a lifetime opportunity, we want you badly and we think that this amount of money expresses that desire.
Billy’s Dad: Billy, this is your decision. And whatever that decision is, you know it’s fine with your mother and I.


[Billy calls Peter up late at night]
Billy Beane: Hey, it’s Billy Beane.
Peter Brand: What time is it?
Billy Beane: I don’t know. Listen, would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: What?
Billy Beane: After I left, you looked me up on your computer. Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: I did, yeah. You were a good player.
Billy Beane: Cut the crap, man! Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: I’d have taken you in the ninth round. Left side and bonus. I imagine you would have passed and taken the scholarship.
Billy Beane: Yeah. Pack your bags, Pete. I just bought you from the Cleveland Indians.
[he hangs up the phone]


[first day in his job]
Peter Brand: Hey, Billy. I wanted you to see these player evaluations that you asked me to do.
[he hands Billy the document]
Billy Beane: I asked you to do three.
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: To evaluate three players?
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: How many did you do?
Peter Brand: Forty seven.
Billy Beane: Okay.
Peter Brand: Actually, fifty one. I don’t know why I lied just there.


[showing Billy his equation for projecting their games]
Peter Brand: So using this equation on the upper left right here, I’m projecting that we need to win at least ninety nine games in order to make it to the pro season. We need to score at least eight hundred fourteen runs in order to win those games and allow no more than six hundred and forty five runs.


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Total Quotes: 69



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